Even Pros Make Mistakes (Yes, I'm the guy who almost released a game with no exit button)

Making Of / 25 March 2020

In this ramped up age of corona virus gloom, I want to talk about something that too many professionals avoid talking about, for fear that some grungy online troll will rise from the magical tarpits of the internets and proclaim them a fraud. In this scenario, the author always assumes that the masses within earshot will suddenly agree and hoist said creative person on their own petard, roasting them as a fraud, feeding the deeply hidden imposter syndrome that nearly all creative people have. And so, professionals who make mistakes hide them, cover them up or willfully forget them. 

A dreary existence of anxiety if we're being honest. Especially when you consider the reality that most of those online bystanders that the author thinks will side with the aforementioned tar troll, are actually not going to tear themselves away from their own facebook, Instagram or tiktok accounts to care or even register that they took any notice.

Real people make mistakes, and creative professionals are no exception. 

No matter how hard you try to seem superhuman and invulnerable, you are human, and that public judgement monster only lives and breaths an existence in your own head. 

That's right. You've been fearing a figment of your own imagination.

We all have this deep seated insecurity that to admit our errors is to expose our fraud to the world. It's not. We think if we point out a mistake, everyone will gossip and talk online and that soon the negative publicity on social media will shut our business down. 

It won't. Telling people that you made a mistake will not ruin your brand or professional image.

Getting caught hiding a mistake or denying it when you know it to be true, that is what will ruin your image. 

Admitting a mistake though? Being the first to tell the world you made it? It won't make your business any less profitable or legitimate. It won't lose you any customers. In fact, owning your mistakes, being up front about them or telling people about them can build a more solid and trustworthy reputation and even earn new customers and followers. 

Admitting mistakes and talking about them has created some of my best articles and advice threads.

Take this article for example. I told you right up front what my mistake was and it got your attention. There's a good chance that most people who read this are going to be new to my work, because I don't have a huge fan base following my work. Just being honest. And that's okay. I'm still a professional making my living in the entertainment industry. I confess that, yeah I could have more fans and that irks me, but I also value my creative output and would rather write this article and then move on to the next instead of traveling the internet like some kind of content vagabond, begging for people to read my content in the hopes of a measly fraction of a cent form a content host or the less than 10% of readers who might one day buy something from me online. 

Yes, in confess I hate having to get people to pay attention to me. But I'm also creative. 

That's why the title of this article is 100% honest and is totally clickbait free.

Yes, I am the guy who almost released a video game with no exit button. 

As I mentioned, I work in entertainment, part of which is creating video games. 

I've been working on my own personal project called Gassy Man, and was ready to launch a free demo edition on my website this week. 

As you may, or may not, have guessed, Gassy Man is the tale of a man who greatly resembles me and flies through the air under the power of his own farts as he saves humanity from alien invaders. Obvs.

Anywho, I was all set to upload the demo this week and let people test it themselves online when I noticed an embarrassing and glaring error. There were no exit buttons, anywhere. None of the menus, none of the game over screens. nothing. Once you started playing the game you could never leave. Even if you hit the "esc" key. The only thing you could do was re-try over and over. 

Super embarrassing and completely dashed my hope of release this week. Though it's only Wednesday, and the problem has been corrected. The build for Windows 10 has been exported and tested, but the browser version to play online still has a bug. When you beat the game the screen turns black and freezes instead of re-loading the main menu and even if you clear the cashe. The browser version of the file never reloads or replays from the beginning once you've beaten the game. 

Looks like I'm going to have to crush some updated books and forums on Unity before I can release this, as I have at least one more mistake to fix. 

As ever and always,

Mike